Here’s How Christians Should Be Making the World Mad

In 2009, Dane Mitchell won New Zealand’s Waikato National Contemporary Art Award (about $11,000) for an installation he called “Collateral.”  It consisted of the discarded packaging materials he had gathered from all the other exhibits vying for the prize.  Needless to say the other entrants were not happy.  (I found this news in News of the Weird)

It’s easy to see why they were upset:  stuff that they believed had no value was shown to be worth something – and people don’t like to be proven wrong.

We especially don’t like to be proven wrong about our judgments of other people:  we like to put everyone in their categories, and we expect them to stay there.  If people show other dimensions of themselves, we are suspicious of them, rather than of our own judgment.  This was a big piece of what made Jesus Christ so controversial:  he announced and demonstrated to the world that every person has value and worth, even people who were categorized by others as “sinners” or “poor”.  The elite and powerful (who thought that the categories they were in were the only ones that mattered) were upset to see someone claim that these other people were equally valued in God’s eyes.

Christians make the world mad in many ways – usually for our perceived intolerance.  And intolerance puts us exactly on the opposite side of Jesus Christ.  The only thing he was intolerant of was the misuse of power.  If we want to make the world mad at us, then let us make them mad in the same way Jesus did:  by declaring and demonstrating that every one of God’s children has gifts to share, and is more than a label.

 

 

 

A Time to Harvest

We hope you will join us this Saturday, October 10th from 10am to 4pm for our Harvest Fair!

There will be great food, a parking lot (and sidewalk) full of crafters, and entertainment all day.  Plus activities for the kids, contests, mums, pumpkins, etc.  If you would like to enter one of our contests, click on the tab Harvest Fair 2015! for more information.

The Harvest Fair began as a way for the church to meet its commitments to our district and denomination:  people harvested their talents to help others.  We are proud to continue in that tradition, providing a great day for the community, and contributing to the ministries of the United Methodist Church, and supporting a local ministry as well.  This year, 10% of our proceeds will go to Oaks Ministry (www.oxfordoaksministry.com).

Just as God sent Jesus Christ into the world not to live for himself, but to give himself for others, we believe that we are invited by God to live in the same manner:  not for ourselves, but others.   That is the narrow path that Jesus says leads to eternal life.    So as we harvest what God has blessed us with, it is not meant to fill our own storehouses, but others’.  Are you harvesting only for yourself?  That might explain while you still feel empty.