Tag Archives: Oxford

Spring Events at OUMC

Spring and the Easter Holiday bring a lot to celebrate, that we want to share with you,

Sunday, April 14, 10:55:  Our choir shares their Easter Cantata

Thursday, April 18, 7pm:  Our Holy Thursday service, with Communion and foot washing

Friday, April 19, 7pm:  A joint Good Friday service with Allen AME, reflecting on the 7 Last Words of Christ.

Sunday, April 21:  HAPPY EASTER!

There is a community service at 7am on the green in the center of town.

                We celebrate at our place at 8:30 and 10:55 (our handbells will play at 10:55)

And here are some other events coming up at our church:

Our monthly buffet breakfast on April 27, from 7am-10am  (we do this every month on the 4th Saturday) – $7 for adults, $3 for kids 3-10)

Roast Beef Dinner on May 4th – seatings at 4:30 and 6.  $15 for adults, $8 for kids 3-10

Ice Cream Social on July 17th from 7pm-8:30pm.  FREE

Vacation Bible School July 28 – August 1 from 6pm-8pm:  “The Incredible Race”  FREE

Every Sunday, this is our schedule:         

8:30am – Informal worship service, with Communion (more relaxed, sing along with a guitar)

9:45am – Sunday School for all ages

10:55am – Traditional worship service (choir, organ), with Communion on the 1st Sunday of the month

We have nursery care all morning!

Who Are We In Oxford, Then?

You might be visiting our site this week to learn more about the Chocolate Festival, or you might be visiting to find out more about us, because the United Methodist Church has been in the news this week, and you’re wondering how we feel about what happened and our special General Conference.

Many of us were hoping for a Pentecost moment, where the Holy Spirit would descend upon the delegates, bringing a moment of clarity to the church. That didn’t happen, so we are left to wrestle with the work of those nearly 900 delegates from around the world, and the outcome.

While it is unclear where the Church with a capital C is headed, our little church here in Oxford is still looking to worship God and love our neighbors in all that we do, and welcoming everyone to join us in all the things that go on here. Jesus Christ lived and died and lives again for everyone, and we believe the church is here for everyone as well. Even as we disagree on what that looks like.

If what happened in St. Louis makes it hard for you to come to our particular church, fine. But don’t let something that happened far away among strangers keep you from connecting with some other group of believers in your town. We are made for community, Christ is found in community, and you will find joy in community. God loves you where you are and as you are.


Rolling River Rampage is almost here!

July 22 – 26 will be here sooner than you know it!  Don’t miss out on a fun week of Vacation Bible School!

Sunday through Thursday, from 6pm to 8pm, we will be going on a Rolling River Rampage.  This is open for kindergarteners through 6th graders.  You can register online through the link below:

Oxford UMC VBS 2018

Lent/Easter Schedule – UPDATED

Have you made your plans yet for the Easter holiday?  Here is what is happening at Oxford United Methodist Church:

Sunday, March 25:  Choir Cantata at the 10:55 service – children’s choir and Spirit Bells as well  (8:30 worship service, and 9:45 Sunday School as usual)

Thursday, March 29:  Holy Thursday Service with Communion and (optional) foot- or hand-washing at 7:00pm

Friday, March 30:  Joint Good Friday Service at Allen AME Church (corner of 8th and Market Streets) at 6:00pm. (NOTE TIME CHANGE)  Refreshments following the service.

Sunday, April 1:   Community Sunrise Service at 7:00am on the green (intersection of Rts 10 & 472)                                                                                                                         Informal Easter worship at 8:30am, with Communion                                   Sunday School at 9:45am                                                                                                 Traditional Easter worship at 10:55am, with our                                             Quarter Ringers handbell choir, and Communion

 

A History of Violence = A Society of Fear

In Luke 16, Jesus tells the parable of the rich man and Lazarus.  The rich man ends up in hell for his sins (neglecting the poor) and wants to warn his brothers so they might avoid his fate.  Abraham tells him his brothers have the words of Moses and the Prophets – that is warning enough.  But the rich man says, “if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.”

To Abraham replies, “If they do not listen to Moses and the Prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.”

I was reminded of this in light of the most recent school shooting, as people express the hope that this will bring about meaningful change to our gun laws.  I don’t think we will have meaningful change, until we have an honest reckoning of our history as a nation.

What Jesus is saying in the parable is that, when we don’t have a correct understanding of our past, it will keep us from understanding what is happening in the present.  The rich man’s brothers have not learned what they should have from Moses and the Prophets, so they will not accept the truth, even from one risen from the dead.  As long as Americans believe the myth that we are a basically peaceful and just people, a majority of us will accept gun violence as an anomaly that cannot be prevented.

The reality is, the United States of America is a nation steeped in violence.  We violently separated from Great Britain; we violently evicted Native Americans from their land; we violently enslaved Africans; we violently settled the issue of slavery (or states rights, depending on your perspective); we oppressed every wave of immigrants that came here from countries that we weren’t familiar with; we have been perpetually at war since our founding.  We have been involved in a war of some sort for 93 percent of our years since our founding.

If we weren’t a violent people, why would we make one of our first priorities in our constitution addressing the issue of arming ourselves?

The reality is that we, as a nation, have almost always seen violence as the answer to our problems, which makes violence the norm, and instead of making us feel peaceful, it makes us more fearful.  And the only way we see to defeat our fears is more violence, because we are afraid if we choose a less violent path, someone else will use violence against us.

I’m not saying all this so that we might feel guilty about being Americans.  I’m saying this because until we acknowledge how violence has shaped us, we cannot see how fear is now warping us.

So, how do we break the pattern?  Well, of course, the answer is Jesus Christ.

Seriously.

First, if you don’t believe in the divinity of Jesus, you at least have the model of someone who responded to the violence of his society with nonviolence, and though he died, he started a movement that, when it adhered to his ideals, brought about change.

Second if you do believe in the divinity of Jesus Christ (as I most definitely do), then you have the freedom from fear, so you can respond to violence in the only way that defeats it.

And that is with death:  our death.  We must allow our desire to respond to violence with violence to die, because that only brings more death.  We must allow our fear that someone might take advantage of us tomorrow to die, because that only permits more death to happen today.

If you are a follower of Jesus Christ, you are on very thin ice when you defend the unfettered right to own guns in the face of all the lives that are damaged by gun violence in our society.  When Peter saw the answer to the violence Jesus was about to face as taking up arms, Jesus told him to put away the sword.  Violence does not end violence: it only births more violence.  And violence never occurs without causing injustice.  When Jesus declined to respond to the violence against himself with violence, he established the path, the narrow path, he wanted his followers to take:  the nonviolent one.

For the sake of America, Christians need to put not America first, but Jesus Christ first, even as that makes us “un-American.”

As followers of Jesus Christ, we are not here for ourselves, or for our nation, but we are here for the oppressed who like Lazarus hunger at our gate for justice and mercy.

The Oxford Great Date Night – February 9

Hey couples!  Celebrate Valentine’s Day early by coming out to the  Oxford Great Date Night on February 9!

Storyteller, singer and plain funny guy Mark Cable will be entertaining us at 7pm in the Penn’s Grove Auditorium (301 S Fifth St, Oxford).  Free dessert at intermission!

Tickets are $20 per couple.  While tickets may be available at the door, don’t wait until the last minute to reserve your spot!  Call the church office (610-932-9698), or learn more at the Oxford Great Date Night Facebook page:   https://www.facebook.com/events/1167307443399355/

Thanks for Joining Us at the Harvest Fair!

Thanks to everyone who joined us for the day.  The weather ultimately cooperated, but it was your being here that made the day special.

We hope we see you again real soon – in worship or at our covered dish and ditty night, or at our breakfast, or at our Halloween Family Fun Night, or at our Veterans Dinner…

 

God’s Idiocracy

To donate to UMCOR Disaster Relief work – visit our donate page for the link.

I stole the word idiocracy from Mike Judge’s film of the same name – about a future where society has become so dumbed down that an average person today  is now the smartest.   In Mike Judge’s world, the term meant “governing by idiots.”

I’m using the word, not because followers of God are idiots, but because we are fools:  or at least we should be.  And “foolocracy” doesn’t sound as good.

It has been the temptation from the very start for followers of Jesus Christ to seek respectability, forgetting that we are following the very personification of God’s Foolishness.  Is there anything more foolish then making an offering of your only son to the same people who have shown again and again that they have a hard time doing what you ask of them?

And God’s offering of Jesus to the world is not out of the ordinary:  it is the culminating act in a  whole history of foolish behavior going back giving us the freedom to obey or disobey in the garden.

The point, though, for us is not to trying figure out why God has been so foolish, but to see how we can be foolish in our own way.  It is God’s foolishness that gives us the joy of knowing Jesus Christ:  our foolishness can help do the same for another.

Claim the Name

It’s pretty funny how much work lawyers have found in the world of rock music.  Lots of legal battles about money and copyrights, and names.  Several years ago 4 members of the group Yes reunited to tour together, but weren’t allowed to use the name Yes, because another former member was using the name.  There were renegade Doobie Brothers who tried to tour using that name, and were sued by other members of the group.   Even the Beach Boys have found a lot of “Fun, Fun, Fun” over the years by suing each other over the use of the name.

Names come with certain expectations.  When we see our favorite band’s name on the marquee, we expect to hear their big hits done well.  And when it’s not who we expect, and they don’t do a very good job, it tarnishes the reputation of everyone associated with the name.

So, it’s frustrating as Christians when we see or hear of things done by others who call themselves Christians , things that we would never do.  How can we respond?  Shouting “that’s not us!” doesn’t seem to help much.

The best we can do, is to work even harder to do the truly Christian things that cannot be disputed:  offering hospitality that welcomes people as they are, offering healing without judgment, advocating for justice and mercy without concern for our own success.  And then, don’t keep it a secret that we, too, are Christians!  Give people a chance to see that what they experienced elsewhere with “Christians” isn’t what they will experience with us.

And pray for healing of the spiritual blindness that afflicts us all.  We might see it more clearly in those we disagree with, but we experience it as well.